because it’s been a long week…

…I present to you a video of a kitten playing with a watermelon. Enjoy.

‘so you think you can dance’: let’s hear it for the boys.

This week’s episode of So You Think You Can Dance marked the first time that a dance has moved me to actual tears. Sure, many of the routines have evoked strong emotions, but I’m talking tears in the eyes, threatening to spill over onto my face. More on that routine later. While I wasn’t getting weepy, I was swooning over the male dancers on the show. Contestants and all-stars alike made me wish I still had a Trapper Keeper so I could write “Alison ❤ Neil” on it (among other names.)

The injuries plague that claimed dearly departed Alex Wong last week struck again, this time in the form of a rib injury for Ashley. Forgettable as she may be, she’s a consistently good dancer, so I hope there isn’t an early departure in her future.

The last time SYTYCD attempted a foray into cultural dance, it resulted in the Russian folk dance fiasco that Jeanine and Phillip were saddled with in season 5. When I heard that Lauren would be dancing a Tahitian dance with Mark, I feared the worst. Before I get into the dance, I would like to thank the Dance gods for bringing Mark back to our TV screen this week; an episode without Mark is an episode without joy. I can’t imagine a better partner than him for this dance, because he brought the perfect amount of masculinity and strength. Lauren got that swively hip action just right, and while I can’t say I want to see this dance every week, it was a welcome
departure from the overwhelming amount of angsty contemporary pieces.

I was all for Adechike and Anya’s salsa last night, but the more I think about it, the less sure I am about its awesomeness. The tricks were great, especially Anya’s prolonged backbend and Adechike’s cartwheel over her arm, but the rest of the dance seemed to be lacking. It was a bit too stop-and-go to accommodate the tricks and lacked the fiery feel of a salsa. Choreography aside, Adechike did a great job of stepping out of his technical comfort zone and attacking something completely different.

One dance that I definitely did not like was Jose and Courtney’s Broadway routine. Joey Dowling’s choreography is hit-or-miss for me, and last night was for sure a miss. I get that they didn’t dance together due to the story of the dance, but the meager steps Jose did perform were executed poorly. I would have rather watched Courtney shimmy around the stage in that ridiculous showgirl costume by herself for the entirety of the dance. Don’t even get me started on that wounded puppy face Jose was pulling during his judging…

As I’m sure you’ve guessed, it was Travis Wall’s contemporary, danced by Robert and Allison, that moved me to tears. The one-two punch of Coldplay’s “Fix You” and the emotional backstory of his mom recovering from surgery was too much for my fragile emotions to handle. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Travis Wall is a genius. His choreography was so strong and so lovely that it would have been just as breathtaking without knowing the inspiration behind the piece. Robert put a lid on his oversized personality and allowed himself to connect with the piece, which definitely showed. I’m going to make a bold statement here and name Allison the best female contemporary dancer in SYTYCD history.

I’d like to thank the Dance gods again for the return of Dancing With the Stars pro Louis van Amstel as a choreographer. I missed him last season, when the new fall format of SYTYCD conflicted with DWTS. I love the jive as much as I love Louis, so one choreographing the other must equal greatness, right? Almost. Billy was able to overcome his nervous laughter from rehearsal and connect with Anya, but I wouldn’t rank this among the show’s top jives. Chopping up Meatloaf’s epic “Paradise By the Dashboard Light” into a minute and thirty seconds seems sacrilegious, and it gave the routine a slightly disjointed feel.

Let me offer another hearty “amen” for Neil. Not just last night, but in general. If they changed the title of the show to So You Think You Can Watch Neil Dance Solo For an Hour, I’d be all for it. I know this season is about the contestants and not the all-stars, but I thought Neil totally ruled this dance last night. Tyce Diorio’s Damn Yankees-themed Broadway piece was shockingly enjoyable. Okay, so Kent was good in this routine, too, because it allowed him to fully embrace his “gee-shucks-Kent!” persona, but I can’t believe Nigel told Neil he was outdanced. No way, no how.

Moving on to the contestants-only dances, (which I’m glad they’re continuing with) Lauren and Billy had a fun jazz from Mandy Moore. Her choreography isn’t usually that great, but this funky, peppy routine to “Boogie Shoes” was enjoyable to watch. (Not to mention I want a pair of those bejeweled Chuck Taylors they were wearing.) Adam was right; Billy truly did just let go and dance, and it showed.

I was shocked at the praise the judges were throwing at Jose after his b-boy dance with Dominic, who he was paired with since there was an odd number of contestants left. There is no way that you could sit there and watch that routine and not see that Jose is nowhere near as good at b-boying as Dominic. This was so obvious when they were dancing side-by-side; the leg windmills (or whatever they’re called) come to mind. I’m sick of all the passes Jose gets from the judges. He needs to be in the bottom three tonight.

Not taking into account the weird story behind the dance, (Kent’s girlfriend is a chair and Adechike doesn’t like her?) Dee Caspary’s contemporary piece was strong, masculine and really used the strengths of both dancers. The use of chairs could have hindered the routine, but the choreography was interesting and different.

The last dance of the night was the first disco of the season, and while I had been wondering when we were going to finally see it, I realized after last night’s routine with Robert and Kathryn that I didn’t really miss it that much. Doriana Sanchez’s choreography used to be non-stop good times, but now it’s evolved into death-defying trick after death-defying trick. Robert wasn’t fabulous in this, but he and Kathryn worked well together considering she had to fill in for the injured Ashley.

I think Jose and Billy or Robert will be joining Ashley in the bottom three tonight, and hopefully she’ll be well enough to continue on in the competition and Jose will be b-boying his way back to Miami.

Photo courtesy of Mark Kanemura’s Twitter account, @mKiK808.

so you think you can dance: judges gone wild

Greetings, Dance fans. Let’s take a journey…through this week’s episode of So You Think You Can Dance. I love how the producers are, in essence, making this up as they go along, changing the format this week to include an all-star pairing as well as a pairing with another competitor. Wise choice. There’s lots of dancing to be done, so let’s get right into this, shall we?

Lauren started the night doing a cha-cha with Pasha and his ballroom jeans. Her costume made her look like a sexy skunk, but she worked every last centimeter of that fringe. Her athleticism definitely worked in her favor this week, as her moves were strong and commanding. When the camera pulled away to a long shot, I could have sworn it was Anya up there. That’s how effortless Lauren made it look. She is improving every week, but I still can’t fully embrace her. I don’t know what it is about her…

Jose and all-star Lauren (she of the bodacious booty,) were the lucky recipients of another 80’s power ballad contemporary courtesy of Mandy Moore. INXS this time, for those of you keeping score. The choreography was weird; Jose barely danced, instead acting as a human prop for Lauren to twirl around. The judges, of course, loved it, praising his “technique” and growth and whatever other cliche phrase they dragged out in their critiques. I understood what Nigel was saying about Jose being true to himself, willing to learn, willing to grow, etc., but the bottom line is that the kid’s technique will never rival any of his competitors’, even on their worst day.

Kent and hip-hop should, in theory, go together about as well as Lindsay Lohan and alcohol, so I was pleasantly surprised by his routine with Comfort. He brought a crisp jazziness (not a real word, but work with me here) to the moves, which at first I thought to be his spin on the moves, but I think it was actually Dave Scott’s smart choreography. Cat was right; there was a bit of a Timberlake-ish vibe from Kent.

Adechike and Courtney’s jazz split the judges, but I thought it was sweet and charming. There was a bit too much prop work at the beginning with the counter and stools, but as Nigel pointed out, the part where they danced off to the side was sublime. Courtney is just adorable and radiant in anything she does, and I don’t care what McBitchy Mia had to say; I thought Adechike was personable and fun to watch. I think her headband was cutting off all blood flow to her brain.

I’m sure Billy and Allison’s Broadway would have been lovely, had the all-star not suffered a flare-up of a rib injury. Have no fear, for season 4’s favorite female dancer, Katee, was conveniently nearby to fill in for Allison. Spencer Liff has proven to be the most consistently great Broadway choreographer on the show, and this thief-themed piece really brought out the precise nature of Billy’s dancing. Katee’s great, but I had my eyes on Billy the whole time.

I was unable to properly assess Ashley and Dominic’s Nap/Tab hip-hop routine because my judgment was clouded by the horrendous song chosen to accompany the number. Ludacris’ “How Low” is one of the most inane songs to ever grace the radio, and now it’s stuck in my head. Thanks, Tabitha and Napoleon. I was also dismayed by the costuming for the dance; I get that it was a ninja theme, but someone in the costume department must really hate Ashley, because those drop-crotch Hammer pants were hideous. Regardless, it was refreshing to see her do something other than contemporary, and she kept up with Dominic quite well.

Robert and Kathryn, or should I say “Bob” and “Kathie,” were dolls come to life in Sean Cheeseman’s jazz. The concept was great, and it played up to Robert’s inherent cheesiness, but the synchronization was very off at the beginning when they were dancing in the boxes. Robert stumbled few a through lifts and turns with Kathryn, bumping her butt on the ground and making her seem awkward and cumbersome. Something was just a smidge off throughout the entire dance.

I have to applaud Nigel and crew for allowing the actual contestants to dance together last night. Some people think this make-it-up-as-we-go format of season 7 is unprofessional, but I think it shows flexibility on the producers’ part and a willingness to try something new. (Take note, American Idol producers.)

Alex and Adechike should have danced a powerful Bollywood together, but an Achilles’ tendon injury sidelined Alex last night. Now, this was definitely not the sharpest Bollywood I’ve ever seen danced, but I think the judges failed to give Adechike any credit. Not only was he dancing with a new (and female) partner, but I’m sure some of the choreography at the end was tweaked to make up for Alex’s absence. Did any of the judges acknowledge this? Of course not. Instead we got freaking Mia Michaels snidely declaring she “missed Alex so much right now.” You know who I missed so much last night? Mary Murphy. Props to Cat, though, for calling out the judges on their hypocrisy. How dare they praise Jose for doing a more lackluster Bollywood a few weeks ago, yet rip Adechike apart for doing the same, if not better? I could have strangled Mia with her stupid headband after she responded, “Jose has heart…” Bring back Mary. Please.

Lauren and Kent’s contemporary was the highlight of the night. Travis Wall is such a genius when it comes to choreography, and last night’s piece was a great showcase for both dancers. The prom story behind the dance was subtle and relatable for Kent and Lauren, considering they both just graduated from high school. This is one of the most emotionally real dances on SYTYCD thus far, and that’s counting standouts like “Bleeding Love,” “No Air,” and “Addiction.” And then there was that kiss at the end….wow.

The producers were cruel enough to “randomly” give Ashley and Robert the quickstep, aka the kiss of death on SYTYCD. This leads me to ask, why continue to include this dance? If it consistently leads to eliminated dancers, then drop it from the lineup. Robert and Ashley did the best they could with this dreaded dance, although the music Jean-Marc and France picked was awful. Fingers crossed that these dancers are spared the fate of other quicksteppers.

The final dance of the evening was an African Jazz, danced by Billy and Jose. This was a meeting of the two SYTYCD staples: personality vs. technique. The premise involved Jose’s hunter preying on Billy’s panther, but I’d say the panther ended up victorious. For a routine that required power, strength and athleticism, Billy excelled while Jose floundered.

If I had to pick a bottom three for tonight, I would say Jose, Robert and maybe Adechike, but I think he’ll get enough sympathy votes to be safe this week.

so you think you can dance: thoughts on season 7 so far

I’ve been unable to catch the entirety of both performance episodes so far, (reason #69263 why we need a DVR, parents!) so I haven’t been able to write recaps like I had wanted. I’m not totally wowed by anyone yet, and I’m still unsure if I like the all-stars format or not. Here is my take on the remaining nine dancers.
I don’t know if it’s the extremely high bar he set for himself during his brief appearance in season six, but Billy Bell has been just so-so in his first two performances. Lame choreography dragged him down in his Tyce Diorio Broadway number, and the poor kid never stood a chance next to Comfort in a krump routine. He needs a contemporary or jazz piece soon to really shine.
Kent Boyd is the cutest, most adorable thing to grace my TV screen since the Gosselin sextuplets. He has enough personality for three people, and regardless if you find him entertaining or not, there’s no denying the boy’s got legitimate dance talent. It was impossible not to smile during his cha-cha-cha with Anya, and even though the costume department saddled him with some heinous S&M-type getup in his jazz with Courtney this week, his technical ability shone through any sartorial missteps. I can’t wait to see him in a hip-hop or Broadway number.
I was ready to send Lauren Froderman back to her cheerleading squad after week one’s disastrous pop-jazz with Ade. Technically, it was great, but that cheesy perma-smile was so off-putting. Her redemption came in the form of a Tessandra Chavez lyrical hip-hop. The cheerleader-y grin was gone and she absolutely nailed the choreography. I’ll warily give her my support, but I’m unsure how successful she’ll be with ballroom or something more obscure, like African Jazz.
I keep forgetting that Ashley Galvan is even on the show; the little airtime she received before the top 11 combined with two routines that didn’t really stand out make for a forgettable dancer. Her contemporary with Neil during week one was okay, although I was confused by her declaration to the judges after she danced that she thought she might be in love. With Neil? You best step off, sister. Week two’s jazz (or contemporary if you’re Nigel Lythgoe,) was better, but she needs something really different to make her stand out next week. Give her a hip-hop with Twitch or a jive with Pasha.
Robert Roldan seems to be doing everything in his power to make himself extremely unlikable. The hammy antics and the spastic mugging for the camera have got to go. Personality aside, I think he has a lot of talent left to show us. The guy’s in an Alvin Ailey dance troupe, for crying out loud. I thought he was better than his all-star counterpart, Courtney, in week one’s African Jazz, and while I missed his Argentine tango with Anya last week, from what I saw, he seemed to hold his own. If he could just stop trying so damn hard to be funny, he could make it pretty far.
Jose Ruiz fashions himself to be Legacy 2.0, but he’s not even close. Legacy rose to the occasion each week and made it seem like he’d been doing whatever given genre his entire life, whereas Jose seems very limited in what he can do outside of the b-boy style. Take this week’s Bollywood number, for example. The judges praised him to no end, but I thought it was the sloppiest performance in that style throughout the entire show’s history. I dread the week where Jose picks contemporary.
Judging by the fact that she’s been in the bottom three both weeks so far, I seem to be in the minority of people who like Melinda Sullivan. Nigel sees an inability to connect with the audience; I see someone who isn’t trying desperately to get votes (I’m looking at you, Robert.) Her week one jive with Pasha was a bit off, and terrible costuming and choreography ruined her week two contemporary piece for me, but I’ve loved both of her “dance for your life” solos so far. I do wish the judges would stop praising her technique for being “just a tapper,” though, because Melinda has repeatedly admitted to taking classes in other styles of dance.
Towards the end of Vegas week, I had hoped that Adechike Torbert would survive and make it to the top ten/eleven/whatever number the producers decided to settle on. I’m starting to forget why I wanted him to move on, because his two performances so far have been less than memorable. In his defense, he was forced to stand out while dancing with all-stars Kathryn and Allison, a seemingly insurmountable task. He needs a dance this week that forces him to show some personality, otherwise he could be gone before top five.
Alex Wong‘s technique is so perfect that even Baryshnikov would feel inadequate. However, I don’t foresee him winning, because as SYTYCD history shows, technically flawless male dancers never win. Just ask Danny, Brandon, Jakob, etc. I don’t think he needs to win this show to have success in the dance industry, though. His Broadway number with Lauren was fun, so I hope he gets something like hip-hop or an upbeat ballroom number to showcase his personality and take some of the focus away from his freakishly amazing technical skills.
As far as the new all-star format, I love it and I hate it. I love it because I get to see people like Neil, Pasha, Mark, Kathryn and Courtney dance again, but that’s also the reason why I hate it. Sometimes I’m so focused on watching the all-star dance that the actual contestant becomes an afterthought. I understand what Nigel and co. wanted to accomplish with the all-stars, but I think cutting down the field from 20 to 10 and putting well-known and well-loved dancers into the mix alters the natural balance of SYTYCD.

words of widsom from the executive level.

Apparently there has been a lack of professional behavior during meetings at my company, which should shock about zero people if they’re familiar with the workings of my office. Someone very high up in my company sent out the following email today, which I present to you as reason #673 why a trained monkey could run my company better than the current management, and as a testament to how proper grammar/spelling/syntax is a lost art form in corporate America. The notations in red are mine, naturally.

Team,

I sent a message to the directors the other day about how to act in a meeting and be professional. It seems to be the message has not been received. (Did you mean “seems to me,” or are you just unaware of how a sentence should be structured?) I know we have a lot of things being thrown at us and trust me  I am addicted to my PDA but I am seeing reps in meetings that are not paying attention at all and are so focused they are not even listening to the meeting. (Run-on sentence much? There should be a smattering of commas in there, too.) I have been in three meetings lately with Global type companies and the Carousel rep is oblivious to what the customer is asking. At one point I had to reprimand two reps who were laughing with each other. If we want to be best in class let’s act like it. (Talk about the pot calling the kettle black…) The last things is our dress code is getting way to relaxed. (Should be “thing” and “too,” and about the dress code – no s**t, Sherlock.) I ask if we are doing a briefing for a customer in any location please wear a jacket or suit. Let’s look our part as well.

Sorry for the long email but we need to pay attention to the people that our (are) asking us to be there (their) advisor (adviser) and be thankful….

The grammar nerd inside of me wept when this email found its way to my inbox. Does this man not know how to operate spell check and/or understand the importance of proofreading? Oy vey…

bullpen lovin’

In a story that seems like something found only in a romantic comedy, Seattle Mariners’ bullpen catcher Jason Phillips spotted a beautiful woman in the stands during a game last May. They made eye contact a few times throughout the game, and Phillips decided to make a bold move. He wrote his name and number on a ball and threw it to her.

They’re getting married this Sunday in the bullpen of Safeco Field.

How adorable is that story? To every woman who’s ever complained that rom coms are unrealistic, I offer Jason Phillips as proof. Romance isn’t dead, people.

That means the meaningful glances* Joba Chamberlain and I shared during the Sox/Yankees game last month must mean something, right?

*We made eye contact. Twice. Not like I was counting or anything.

Photo of Jason Phillips courtesy of baseball-fever.com.

please tell me this is a wig.

Tom, whoever told you this was a good idea was wrong. Even if it was Gisele. It may just barely work for Justin Bieber, but he’s practically still in preschool. I just pray that this is some kooky off-season thing, like, “Oh, cool, I can grow a weird Dorothy Hamill-esque ‘do in the summer and then chop it all off before the season starts!” This is almost as misguided as that horrible mustache Mark Sanchez attempted to pull off for a few games last year.

Photo courtesy of Splash News via Dlisted.

have we found the song of summer 2010?

Every year after Memorial Day, the music industry scrambles to name the song that will be the song of that summer; a song so ubiquitous that it’s forever associated with that year. I can’t hear Rihanna’s “Umbrella” without thinking of the summer of 2007, and the summer of 2009 belonged to Lady Gaga and “Love Game.” It’s still technically spring until mid-June, but it’s safe to award the title of song of summer 2010 to Katy Perry’s “California Gurls.”

Whether you’re from “the golden coast,” the east coast, or somewhere in between, there’s no denying the song’s sunny, upbeat feel. It practically begs to be played somewhere sandy and warm. True to summer song form, it’s as commercial as it gets, the most profound lyric being Perry’s assertion that “there must be something in the water.” The bass line is straight out of the 70’s, evoking images of roller skates and hot pants. Were this song released any other time of the year, it just wouldn’t feel right.

That doesn’t mean it’s without its faults, though. The first verse is fun, and you can’t help but sing along with the chorus, agreeing that California girls are “fine, fresh, fierce.” I start to grit my teeth in the second verse, especially on the line “We freak in my Jeep/Snoop Doggy Dog on the stereo.” Perry’s voice turns into some AutoTuned mishmash of sounds on the last note. The chorus helps restore my faith, but then a guest rap by Snoop Dog makes me turn up my nose. I can’t explain why, but I’ve always found Snoop a bit creepy, but I do appreciate a man who knows what a tankini is and is able to rhyme it with “martini” “weenie” and “in betweeny.” That’s the sign of a linguistic genius, folks.

All criticisms aside, I do turn up the radio every time this song comes on (which is quite often.) Because when your life consists of driving a 15-year-old Buick around northern Connecticut, you can’t help but be jealous of someone who can get away with Daisy Dukes and a bikini top as daily attire. I raise a gin and juice to you, Katy Perry. Enjoy your reign as the summer song of 2010.

Photo courtesy of Amazon.com.

i’m a beLEEver : )

Well America, like it or not, your American Idol is….(cue unnecessarily long pause where Lee nearly vomited on himself and Crystal appeared to stop breathing) LEE DEWYZE! The paint salesman from Chicago beat out the single mom from Ohio by a close margin, capping off what some claim to be the worst season of Idol thus far. I wouldn’t say worst…maybe more like most boring? Most phoned-in judging?

I was never a huge Crystal fan, so I was happy with the results. Going into the show last night, I honestly had no clue who would win, because I don’t put much faith in stuff like DialIdol, but I think it came down to the fact that Lee’s fans were more likely to mobilize and vote because he appealed to a younger audience.Regardless if you were a staunch MamaSox supporter or not, you had to smile just a teensy bit at the outpouring of gratitude and pure excitement from Lee after he won.

It will be interesting to see how well Lee does in his post-Idol endeavors; Entertainment Weekly posed the question, “Will Lee be the next Kelly Clarkson or the next Taylor Hicks?” I think it’s wayyyy too soon to tell; let the guy tour, soak in his new life, figure out what kind of music he wants to make, and then pass judgment. I urge any haters to check out Lee’s pre-Idol stuff on YouTube or iTunes before they make any snap decisions.

I made it through 42 episodes of American Idol, which probably means I lost about 60 hours of my life to this show. I will never get to reclaim those lost hours, but I had fun watching and recapping. From the shocking elimination of Alex Lambert to the misused Judges’ Save, and all the way through to the finale, it was an interesting ride.

Thoughts on (the second hour of) the finale:

-LOVED Casey James and Bret Michaels singing “Every Rose Has Its Thorn.” Did not love a celebrity who nearly escaped death and had a minor stroke last week performing without telling his doctor.  Bret is the ultimate Comeback Kid, though.

-Not gonna lie, I was enjoying Larry Platt’s dance moves during “Pants on the Ground.” When William Hung came out, however, he just ruined the fun.

-Paula Abdul looked great, but her “roast” of Simon was so awkward.

-All of the past Idol winners and top 12s from past seasons coming back to sing to Simon was a great TV moment. It’s easy to forget how many people have experienced success from this show.

-Joe Cocker kind of scared me…

-Departing musical director Rickey Minor did not get any acknowledgment from the show, which is a shame and kind of embarrassing on the producers’ part.

Photo courtesy of Reuters.

“american idol” top 4: consider the shark jumped.

If all of the preceding episodes of American Idol this season were distress signals, then last night’s performance episode was those signals flat lining. “Songs of the Cinema” night was an all-around disaster. The judges could barely muster up any relevant critiques, and even the praised performances were just so-so in comparison to other things we’ve seen from the contestants this season. This is the top four, people! This is the time when you need to step up your game, not sit back and churn out something mediocre that borders on karaoke.
Before I get to the actual singing, I have to address the ridiculous theme and equally ridiculous mentor. Ryan proclaimed that everyone loves the movies, but that doesn’t mean that everyone loves songs from the movies. Based on the pathetic list of songs the top four had to choose from, I gathered that the theme was actually “Songs Written Specifically For a Movie,” rather than “Any Song In a Movie/On Its Soundtrack.” Nine times out of ten, songs that are penned to play over closing credits of movies are dull and schlocky, which explains why I spent most of last night waiting for Idol to be over so Glee could start. This type of theme is usually a momentum killer, which is exactly what happened.
Jamie Foxx was partly to blame; he spent more time obsessing over his silly “artist” and “contestant” shirts than he did offering any useful critique. No, I don’t think sticking his face in Lee and Casey’s personal space counts as mentoring. Maybe I’m still riding high from the excellent mentoring of Harry Connick, Jr. last week, but it seemed like Foxx was just there for the face time and didn’t care too much about the contestants.
Lee Dewyze and his face full of spray tan opened the show with a shaky version of Seal’s “Kiss By a Rose.” First of all, way to pick an awful song, Lee, and second, please stop dressing like you’re performing at Zeta Chi’s Beer Bash 2010. The pitch was just beyond his grasp the entire song, and all of the words ended in a vague mumble. You know I adore Lee, but I had to hide my face behind a pillow in embarrassment.
Here’s a shocker: Big Mike picked one of Michael Jackson’s cheesiest songs, the Free Willy song “Will You Be There.” Nothing about this performance indicated that Mike has the chops to become the next American Idol. I’m hoping Big Mike will be heading home tonight. Free Willy, indeed.
I missed out on season 8, so I hadn’t seen any duets on Idol until last night. I think it’s a great idea, and I’m all for duets being introduced earlier on in the season. Group night creates lots of drama and entertainment during Hollywood Week, so why not carry that into the rest of the show? Lee and Crystal sang “Falling Slowly” from the movie Once. I loved how their mic stands were positioned to face each other, and I also loved that they both played guitar. I wasn’t too keen on how their voices meshed; Crystal’s Joplin-esque howl was a bit grating against Lee’s gravelly tone. Things definitely picked up around the chorus, and Lee redeemed himself for his hideous solo performance just minutes before. Bonus points to Crystal for calling Lee her “musical crush.”
Back in solo land, Casey chose “Mrs. Robinson,” which is hands-down my favorite Simon and Garfunkel song. It could have been okay, but he chose to sit in the crowd and play a mandolin to a slowed-down version of the song. The judges were so proud of themselves for making the connection between the Graduate and Kara’s supposed crush on Casey, but anyone with half a brain/knowledge of music history knows that the song was originally titled “Mrs. Roosevelt” and was changed only to fit in with the movie. Nice try, though, Randy.
Crystal was the only solo performer to change up her song a bit, but no amount of orchestral rearranging could hide the fact that “I’m All Right” is the song from Caddyshack. It was the best performance of the night, but that’s like saying it was the pile of dog poop that smelled the least. I did enjoy her boyfriend’s American flag pants, though. Forgive me if this sounds incredibly mean, but her boyfriend is way cuter than I thought the boyfriend of Crystal Bowersox should be.
The duet between Casey and Big Mike was like a nonentity, as I think one of them will be going home tonight and the other next week. I do enjoy “Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman?” for the cheesy ballad that it is, and I thought the guitar stylings of the two gents worked well. Casey may not be the next American Idol, but damn, that guy can play the guitar. Their harmonizing wasn’t as bad as I thought, but someone was way sharp during the chorus (methinks it was Casey.)
Will there be a shocking, Chris Daughtry-type elimination tonight as we see who makes it into the top three? You never know with American Idol
Photo courtesy of Fox.com.